Managing Online Risk’s Monthly Recap (Sept, 2016) – Stories Relating to Online Security & Risk

security words on a wrinkled piece paper

Welcome to our recap of stories relating to Online Security and Risk. This month’s stories cover many issues including: When AI goes to the dark side; National Cyber Security Awareness Month; Amy Schumer is most dangerous celebrity on McAfee’s list; Yahoo’s data breach; BYOD & social media biggest internal security threats; wearable technology; 7 deadly Internet security sins; Dropbox hack; anatomy of a social media attack; and more.

These are some of the articles, reports, posts, etc. that caught our attention this week. We originally send them out through our twitter account @DGOnlineSec, so follow us to get them as we find them. But many of them are such great resources we don’t want you to miss them, so we’ve decided to put them as a monthly recap. Some have links that will take you to their original sources, whether Lexology, PC Mag, SC Mag, NLR, and/or others. Others you need to go directly to our Twitter account to view. Enjoy and let us know some of the stories you’ve found interesting this week. Just share in the comments below.

Gwinnett Tech Forum: The Evolution of Wearable Technology

Using smart watch

Partnership Gwinnett hosts quarterly Technology Forums (http://www.gwinnettchamber.org/gwinnett-technology-forum/). I enjoy attending them because they always have interesting topics, knowledgeable speakers, and great networking with technology professionals. The last one I attended was called “The Evolution of Wearable Technology.” Panelists included Rick Erazo (RE), of AT&T Wearable IOT; Todd Charest (TC), Chief Innovation and Product Officer, Ingenious Med; and Peter Presti (PP), Research Scientist at Georgia Tech IMTC Georgia Tech. The panel was moderated by Robert McIntyre (RM), from the Wireless Technology Forum.

The discussion began with some introductory remarks and a history of wearable technology – where it came from up to where it is now. The moderator then presented a series of questions for each panelist regarding how they use the technology, what are the trends and obstacles they see, and how they believe this technology will change employer and consumer behavior. Below I have put some highlights form the discussion.

Check their website for future Forum dates.

Hurdles for wearable technology?

Size, battery life, and consumer behavior.

Factors of adaptability of wearable technology?

Health, productivity, safety and security.

Interesting stats:

  • 10% of wearable devices will be working on a cellular network.
  • 24 million devices were in use by end of 2015.
  • A 36% annual growth is expected in this market through 2017.
  • By 2018 it will be a $12 billion range market.

There is a difference between non-traditional OEM’s of wearable technology and enterprise wearable technology.

Non-Traditional OEM Enterprise
Concerned with how the device “looks” on the body

Personal preferences, tastes, personality traits of the wearer, fashion, lifestyle

 

Concerned with how the device “functions” and affects productivity

Ex. Google glass flopped with consumers but has been taken up by service providers

  1. Why are wearables taking off?
    • Mass adoption of smart phones. (RE)
    • There are better user interfaces and user experiences now. (RE)
    • A wearable is not just the device but also an infrastructure. (PP)
    • We are understanding better behavior change – behavioral engineering – so now we can collect data passively and do something with the data to make lives better. (TC)
  2. Is the wearable the extension of the human or is the human the extension of the wearable?
    • We start with the human first. (TC)
    • We may be transitioning in to a “Borg Lab” (from Star Trek) where humans and wearables will co-evolve (like clothes). (PP)
    • An extension of the human 0 that fashion element that represents who you are to the world – like luxury items. (RE)
  3. How will wearables enhance and challenge the workplace?
    • Wearables can work very well in certain areas – like manufacturing – like id badges – for authentication and to provide access. (RE)
    • Any job that needs interaction with a terminal can use a wearable. (PP)
    • We are collecting a vast amount of data today – information overload – we need to learn how to make sense of it. It will not be fashion but usability that will determine a higher adoption rate in the workplace. (TC)
  4. What about privacy and security?
    • These are the biggest challenges in this market. How do we strike a balance? What is the younger generation’s understanding of privacy, etc.? (TC)
    • What happens to the data collected by the wearable beyond health – photos, etc.? Regulatory policy will come into this space within the next 5-10 years. (PP)
    • These are critical to adoption multi-faceted approach through every step in the use of the wearable for security. We each need to access our risk. Need to look at mobile device management – and update IT policy to include wearables and IoT; especially bio-data of employees. (RE)
  5. Which wearable is your favorite and why?
    • Google Glass – a massive social experiment of what people are willing to accept and not to accept. Fashion vs. form vs. function – what is the right way to build these things? (PP)
    • Samsung Gearup 2 and Timex Metropolitan (RE)
    • Need to look at the breath and depth; my smartphone, Apple Watch (convenience and social acceptability), Fitbit (social norms) (TC)
  6. Which wearable technology company should we buy stock in?
    • Fashion name brands like The Fossil Group which just acquired Misfit. (RE)
    • Small start-ups; Pulse Wave monitoring company (PP)
    • Companies working with cognitive computing; self-driving cars; insurance companies (DC)
  7. Other comments:
    • Problem with Google Glass is that its battery life is too short so it is not good for constant and long-term monitoring (PP)
    • Empowered patients – “sitting (not moving) is the new smoking” – this is a public health concern; we need to get employees moving (PP)
    • This will be a competitive space, but a big challenge is that the data collected in one device is not transferable to different platforms. (TC)
    • Who owns the data? Will you be beholden to a certain brand because they have your data (not ideal). The user should own the data. (PP)
    • It will be a crowded space (RE)

Resources:

Chapter 2 Update: Biometrics

Believe it or not, biometrics has been around for over 20 years. Recently I participated in an ISSA Webinar titled “Biometrics & Identity Technology Status Review” (http://www.issa.org/?page=August2015). The moderator was Phillip Griffin, ISSA Fellow, and the speakers were Michael F. Angelo and Kevin Mangold.

Angelo began the 2-hour session with an eagle eye approach to the topic – he began with definitions types, and a brief history of biometric technology and application. For him the three basics of biometrics are: quality control, types, and anti-spoofing. He divided the kinds of biometrics into four categories:

  1. Common (fingerprint, iris, face, voice)
  2. Becoming more common (handwriting, keystroke, hand geometry)
  3. Rare (retina, handprint, thermography of faces)
  4. Exotic (DNA, gait, brain waves, smell)

Angelo concluded by stating his belief that privacy and specifically legislation passed because of privacy concerns is the number one threat against the full-scale use of biometrics and application development.

The second speaker was Kevin Mangold a computer scientist from NIST. His focus was on security standards for identity management and biometrics. He emphasized the work of OASIS – Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards, which began in 1993 and currently has over 5000 participants from 600+ organizations and 65+ countries (https://www.oasis-open.org).

The ISSA conference page for this session does have a PowerPoint slide deck you can review for details of the above discussion.

Some recent articles and additional resources to review regarding biometrics are listed below. Although it’s been around for a while biometrics are developing rapidly as more and more consumers express concern regarding safeguarding their data and personal information.

What has been your experience with biometrics? Any research, books, etc. you would recommend for others to review won this topic? Join the conversation by entering your comments below.

 

Mobile Biometrics Market Poised To Explode By 2020

Amanda Vicinanzo, 08/25/2015

http://www.hstoday.us/briefings/industry-news/single-article/mobile-biometrics-market-poised-to-explode-by-2020/c0445a17f008a575e3a0f6a1fadf99c7.html

 

Biometrics: The password you cannot change

Aimee Chanthadavong, 08/26/2015

http://www.zdnet.com/article/biometrics-the-password-you-cannot-change/

 

The Boring and Exciting World of Biometrics

Tim De Chant 06/18/2013

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/tech/biometrics-and-the-future-of-identification/

 

The Biometric Consortium

http://www.biometrics.org

Biometrics Institute

http://www.biometricsinstitute.org

 

2015 Cyber-security Summit Atlanta

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On July 15, 2015, the US Chamber of Commerce (https://www.uschamber.com) partnered with the Georgia Chamber of Commerce (https://www.gachamber.com), the Georgia Institute of Technology (http://www.gatech.edu), and the Technology Association of Georgia (http://www.tagonline.org), to present the Atlanta Cyber-security Summit (https://www.uschamber.com/event/georgia-2015-cybersecurity-summit).

The event is part of a nationwide tour stopping at various cities throughout the US to promote awareness and preparedness of companies regarding cyber-security risks and threats, as well as resources and strategies to prevent, manage, and recover from them. The half-day event included various speakers from local and national FBI, Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, NIST, US Army Cyber Protection Brigade, and corporate representatives. Their presentations were full of valuable information – some new and some as refreshers, but all good components of a business cyber security toolkit.

I have put down some highlights and thoughts below, as well as some of the resource URL’s that they shared with us. What are you doing from a business standpoint on the issue of cyber-security? Do you even know where to start? One myth that we should do away with right now is that size does not matter in this arena in terms of being a target – it matters in terms of the resources we have to protect our data and mitigate incidents. But it is not futile. As a business professional you do need to think about how to incorporate some security controls in your operations. Although the message was clear from this event that our adversaries (i.e. hackers, etc.) have their own rules that they play by and will not give up the attacks, it is also clear that there are resources and help out there from the US government, military and private sectors. So read a bit, check them out, and let us know if you have any questions.

Ann M Beauchesne, Senior Vice President of the US Chamber of Commerce began her discussion with a poignant statement “The Internet is infested” and “90% of all cyber attacks are done to private companies.” She added that the focus is now on health records – “that when stolen are worth their weight in gold.”   This was a recurring theme – the records do not weigh physically but they weigh heavily with value. Another recurring message throughout the day was the increased use of social media and social networking tools by cyber-terrorists to get their messages out, recruit new jihadists, and create a cyber-jihad army. One tool spotlighted for them – YouTube.

Ann was followed by Tino Mantella, CEO of the Technology Association of Georgia. Tino indicated that in Georgia alone the cyber-security industry consists of more than 10,000 jobs and has raised $4.7 billion in revenue. His emphasis was that cyber-security is a “growing national security challenge.” Tino introduced Jim Kerr, General Counsel of Southern Company (http://www.southerncompany.com), who spoke about how the electricity industry is approaching the cyber-security threat with cooperation and collaboration. Jim talked about how vital energy was for the “health and happiness” of people and so their systems must be reliable and resilient. The challenge of cyber-security is that “we do not necessarily see them coming” and in essence “we are under attack every day – millions of times a day – in fact, people are in our systems as I speak today.” He emphasized the importance of government and industry communication and collaboration. This message was also reiterated a number of times.

Next on the agenda was Adam Sedgewick, Senior IT Policy Advisor, for The National Institute of Standards and Technology (http://www.nist.gov). Adams spoke about the NIST Cyber-Security Framework (http://www.nist.gov/cyberframework/), describing its components and its usefulness for business of all sizes, but especially small-to-midsize businesses, to ensure cyber-security in their companies. The five main concepts include: identify, protect, detect, respond, and resolve. Adam ended with a brief statement of how the US is now introducing this framework internationally (EU, Japan, etc.) to begin the conversation of worldwide standards.

One of the main objectives of these summits is to introduce local businesses to local law enforcement who can assist them should they experience an incident. Murang Pak and Michael Anaya represented Georgia FBI (https://www.fbi.gov/atlanta), and Alan Davis represented Georgia Secret Service (http://www.secretservice.gov/ectf_atlanta.shtml). An important point brought up by Agent Anaya was the fact that “hacking” technology has progressed so much that you know have “unsophisticated hackers using tools developed by very sophisticated actors.” These actors could be criminals, nation states, individuals, etc. The agents agreed on that information sharing is so important when it comes to cyber-attacks since by reviewing and analyzing the data they can “identify a migration of threats from one company to another” and can warn the company to prevent the attack from happening or from causing extensive damage and/or loss.

Following the break, the private sector panel was bright up including Matthew Eggers of the US Chamber of Commerce, Dr. Steve Cross, Executive Vice President for Research, Georgia Tech, Sean Franklin, Vice President of Cyber Intelligence for American Express (https://www.linkedin.com/pub/sean-franklin/49/76/695), and Jeff Schilling, Chief Security Office of Firehost (https://www.firehost.com).   Their discussion ended up focusing on specific threat trends and security concerns of the Internet of Things. Dr. Cross offered two great resources form Georgia Tech, their annual emerging threat report (https://www.gtisc.gatech.edu/pdf/Threats_Report_2015.pdf) and APIARY, an automated framework for malware analysis and threat intelligence (http://apiary.gtri.gatech.edu). Jeff talked about the consequence of not knowing your own system as one of the causes of cyber-security failures. “Know they self, know thy enemy” he quoted. “Do you know your own system – its vulnerabilities and its strengths?” Sean took a humorous approach to IoT “my refrigerator keeps threatening my toaster.” But his statement is funny because so many see the future truth in it. We know there are millions of devices connected to the Internet now, what happens when they start talking to each other and telling our secrets?

Before lunch Thad Odderstol, Director of Industry Engagement for the Department of Homeland Security offered a number of tools and resources for combating cyber-attacks (http://www.dhs.gov/topic/cybersecurity) and Col. Donald Bray talked about the Army Cyber Mission Force and the new Cyber Security Branch the Army is starting. Col. Bray also discussed briefly the Army training in cyber-security initiative from the Army Cyber Institute at West Point (http://www.usma.edu/acc/SitePages/Home.aspx), to the US Cyber Command (http://www.arcyber.army.mil) to be consolidated in Fort Gordon, Georgia.

The luncheon keynote brought us Mark Guiliano, Deputy Director of the FBI. He used the recent cyber-attack on SONY as an example of cooperation between government and corporate. He outlined the “dark net” that we are combating and the agility of our adversaries. He also emphasized the importance of information sharing and spoke about the Cyber-security Information Sharing Act (https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/senate-bill/754) and why the government having access to encryption keys is so important. “Our job is to keep Americans safe. We can’t do that efficiently and effectively if we do not know what is going on” since right now so many criminal actors use encrypted channels to communicate and organize attacks. The Act is still being debated in Congress.

The Summit ended with the presentation of Dr. Phyllis Schneck, Deputy Undersecretary for Cyber security, National Protection, & Programs Directorate of DHS (http://www.dhs.gov/person/phyllis-schneck-nppd). Her message was two-fold. DHS number one priority is building TRUST with the private sector, and one way they will do that is to BUY new technology from them.

This half-day was packed with information and expertise. But what does it all mean. Some skeptics would say this summit was part of an organized propaganda campaign for CISA and DHS – to “educate” the private sector about the need for giving government the keys to their data and to start building the “trust” Dr. Schneck spoke about. Perhaps. But they still offered a lot of good resources and tools for small and midsize businesses, who may not have a political agenda, but do have a bottom line to protect and grow.

Did you attend the Summit in Atlanta or in another city? Share you experience and/or thoughts in the comment box below. One thing is for sure – the conversation about cyber-security will continue.

 

Managing Online Risk Chapter 2 Add. Resources

headshot of young blonde woman with moble phone

Internal and External Risks

These are resources are to help you apply some of the concepts, best practices, and lessons learned from the content in each chapter. Most of them are in addition to what are already listed in the book and serve to complement the highlighted resources in the chapters. Post in the comments others that you would recommend.

  1. Alien Vault: 5 Mobile Device Security Policies to Help You Sleep at Night (Nov 2014) https://www.alienvault.com/blogs/security-essentials/5-mobile-device-security-policies-to-help-you-sleep-at-night
  2. Consumer Reports Guide to Internet Security http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/electronics-computers/guide-to-internet-security/index.htm
  3. National Cyber-Security Alliance http://www.staysafeonline.org
  4. Google Online Security Blog http://googleonlinesecurity.blogspot.com
  5. Lookout, Inc. Mobile Security https://www.lookout.com
  6. Roger Kay for Forbes: Mobile Security Takes Center Stage (Sept. 2014) http://www.forbes.com/sites/rogerkay/2014/09/16/mobile-security-takes-center-stage/
  7. CBS News: Mobile security tips: How to protect or hide data on your smartphone (Sept. 2014) http://www.cbsnews.com/news/mobile-security-tips-protect-hide-data-on-smartphone/